WAVE3 News Interviews Tre Pryor Regarding Low Housing Inventory in Louisville

I’ve been fortunate enough to be asked to appear on Wave3 news five times now. As a local expert, it’s been my pleasure to share what I’ve learned. This most recent interview appeared on March 17th and covered the current low levels of housing inventory in Louisville, Kentucky. The title of the piece: Looking for a new home? Good luck. Inventory is way down because of COVID-19.

Photo of Tre Pryor on Zoom call with David Mattingly, anchor with NBC Wave3
Photo of Tre Pryor on Zoom call with David Mattingly, anchor with NBC’s Wave3 news.

Housing inventory in Louisville is currently at historic lows. This makes it an extreme seller’s market. Buyers today will have a very difficult time purchasing a new home.

If anyone would like a more specific answer to your particular real estate needs, please contact me anytime.

It’s also interesting to note that Melissa Bottom, who, along with her husband, was also interviewed in this piece. They are my clients whom I’m helping purchase a new home that’s currently being built.

Recommending her to David for this piece gave it a more personal touch that really brings home the current difficulties buyers are facing due to the low housing inventory in Louisville.

Previous interviews with Tre Pryor:

I’ve tried to download the video for future reference but the website doesn’t allow it and only displays it for a limited time.

Local NBC Affiliate Interviews Tre Pryor for Housing Story

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Third times the charm? I’m not sure, I’ll let you be the judge.

A past client asked me to be on camera and share some Louisville real estate knowledge. This piece by Wave3 anchor David Mattingly is looking at our housing shortage.

Affordable houses in Louisville hard to find

As is typically the case, most of the interview doesn’t make it on air but I was happy to help. At the same time… I hate seeing myself on screen. How does my wife put up with me?

Readers Beware: Media Writes For Money or Influence

I’ll admit it, I’m idealistic. Whether that’s a genetic or learned behavior, I’m not in a position to deduce. But I am, and at the mid-way point of this life, I doubt that’ll change.

Great looking Louisville home with vinyl side
Sure, it costs less to clad the exterior with vinyl side than brick but not half the price of the entire home.

It’s my desire that the media is supposed to report the unbiased, unembellished truth.

The truth, as it turns out, is that the media fits the facts to their agenda, whether that’s selling more newspapers, getting more hits on their Web sites or influencing people to their cause. I can’t say it any more simply than that.

Today’s example is truly a mild one. But because it falls under that mantle of Louisville real estate, it caught my eye.

Eric Flack wrote “Law not on side of property owners hurt by vinyl homes” earlier this month. Sticking up for the everyman against big corporations has been the modus operandi for many in the media since Day One.

But what’s interesting to me about this piece is how the case was made with such exaggeration. Flack apparently interviewed Louisville Metro Councilman James Peden for the story; there are direct quotes in it. But look at this paragraph.

Peden said all brick homes that sold for $300,000 in Washington Green are having their property values pulled down by vinyl homes that sell for half that. Peden said the cheaper homes bring down property values so much existing homeowners often can’t sell or refinance because they’ve lost so much equity.

Doesn’t that read like, switching a brick-clad home to a vinyl-clad home reduces the home’s cost by 50%? Absurd!

That tells me that the truth must bend to make their point.

Next time you’re chatting with a builder, ask them how much more brick is than vinyl and they’ll confirm that brick is generally 2x-4x the cost of vinyl but that’s only the exterior cladding, not the cost of the entire home.

The main thrust of the story is whether or not developers have the legal right to modify a subdivision’s deed restrictions due to market changes but that question doesn’t seem to get answered. Incite aggression and the WAVE3.com Web site gets more traffic.

See? Even I got hooked by their strategy.